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25 Amusing Anecdotes From The Insular World Of 4chan

On October 1, 2003, fifteen year old Christopher 'Moot' Poole launched an anonymous, image-based bulletin board called 4chan, not yet knowing what an impact the modest web experiment would have on internet culture in the coming years. Today, one can find a variety of boards on the website dedicated to niche interests, including anime & manga, cosplay, comics, video games, political incorrectness, quests, and a vast array of NSFW content. But at the time of its launch, 4chan hosted only one 'random' board called /b/. Despite its simple beginnings, 4chan hasn't significantly changed in its nearly eighteen years of existence. Unlike other notable message board websites like Reddit, you don't need to register an account to participate (in fact, there is no account registration), you must upload an image to begin a new thread, and anyone can post anonymously. Although there are a list of general site rules and specific rules for each board that users must obey in order to avoid getting banned, to this day the site is one of the more uninhibited corners of the internet. Because of this, 4chan has been the subject of much controversy over the years. As the terminally-online know all too well, the ability to post freely and anonymously will inevitably yield disturbing and ugly results. But despite the fact that many view 4chan as a grotesque reflection of the darkest aspects of the human condition (as it very well may be), it's impossible to deny that the infamous website has influenced the internet in ways that no other web-based 'community' has. Out of the boards of 4chan rose rage comics, lolcats, and duckrolling (the precursor to rickrolling). One could argue that 4chan was the birthplace of the internet meme as we know it. 4chan may be a fringe online ecosystem shrouded in mystery to those who consume their memes from the safety of Twitter or Instagram, but some research has suggested that most of the memes in circulation originated from /pol/, which raises the question—do we forgive 4chan for the alt-right, because...memes? 

Ironically, screenshots of the most innocuous and least offensive posts from notoriously feral boards like /b/ now have their own home on a subreddit called r/greentext, or 'the realm of the most anti-climactic short stories from 4chan.' Many of the snippets featured on the sub collectively paint a more somber, tragic, and sometimes even wholesome picture of the 'anon' character. It's fascinating how the perception of an entire internet ecosystem can be manipulated by curating the content it produces. One could just as easily collect the most reprehensible posts from 4chan and suddenly 'anon' becomes an entirely unsympathetic character. In reality, 'anon' is millions of users—some malicious, some well-intentioned, all participating in an internet of anarchy that is difficult to define. We've collected some of the more harmless snapshots of /b/ via r/greentext, not to misrepresent the website, but instead to offer a small window into the insular world of 4chan to those who are mildly curious.

green text, 4chan, reddit, funny 4chan posts, funny posts, anecdotes, funny stories, memes, pepe, gaming
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Your Favorite Memes And Photos, Now With More Carbs

We've been seeing a lot of photos transformed into piles of spaghetti, and now we know why. Ostagram, a web application that was introduced in 2015, allows users to process their photos with other images, ranging from fine art (Van Gogh) to...the aforementioned pile of spaghetti. The spaghetti filter has been really popular within the meme community, transforming everyone from Pepe to Donald Trump into a carb-laden feast. Here is a selection of our favorite pasta-filtered memes and images. 

Funny memes that are put through a filter to make it look like they are spaghetti, chewbacca, star wars, anime, man of culture, donald trump, pepe the frog, ostagram.
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Best Of: Pictures of People Before and After Calling Them Beautiful Memes

In May 2015 photographer Shea Glover uploaded a video titled ""People react to being called beautiful" to Youtube. The video, which is exactly what it claims to be, has impressively gained over million views in two years. It wasn't until January 2016, when an image macro featuring screenshots of people and their reactions to the compliment, that people started meme-ifying the image. The meme has been going strong since its first exploitation (featuring Thom Yorke of Radiohead) - covering subjects from Pepe the Frog to Star Wars. These are our favorites.

Collection of funny memes in the format of Pictures of People Before and After Calling Them Beautiful, topics such as Star Wars, Pepe, Shrek, Rick and Morty, Spongebob Squarepants.
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The Creator of Pepe the Frog Drew a Horrific Comic to Work Through His Feelings About Alt-Right Pepe

Many of us are hoping to wake up in 2017 and realize 2016 was all just a dream... And no one wishes that more than Matt Furie, apparently.

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memes pepe hate symbol The Anti-Defamation League Calls the Pepe Meme a Hate Symbol and It Feels Real Bad Man
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 The Anti-Defamation League has labeled Pepe the Frog as a hate symbol because white supremacists on the internet have made bigoted versions of Pepe... not as rare as they ought to be. From the ADL website:

In recent years, with the growth of the "alt right" segment of the white supremacist movement, a segment that draws some of its support from some of the above-mentioned Internet sites, the number of "alt right" Pepe memes has grown, a tendency exacerbated by the controversial and contentious 2016 presidential election.  Though Pepe memes have many defenders, not least the character's creator, Matt Furie, who has called the alt right appropriation of the meme merely a "phase," the use of racist and bigoted versions of Pepe memes seems to be increasing, not decreasing.


via Anti-Defamation League

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