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Girlboss Boasts About Rearranging Her Phone Apps, No-one Is Impressed

If some parts of social media are anything to go by, it would seem that we're living in the age of manifestation. Anybody who's anybody wants to find a better place in life is placing their hopes in willing it into reality. 

The method is simple. All you have to do to attract happiness, love and money is act like you definitely have each of those things already.  More importantly, its proponents are everywhere: purpose made accounts like Affirmations sell the idea in a semi-ironic colorful aesthetic and countless spiritual practitioners are selling the dream that you attract what you think.

Understandably, not everyone is overly convinced about this. Nonetheless, it hasn't stopped the concept from becoming popular with every hustle-ready influencer and wannabe in the land, although some of them have also faced a severe dunking for it. 

The latest of these is @girlsthatinvest on Twitter, who received criticism after posting about her dedication to the grift. Taking tips from an anonymous CEO, she rearranged all the app folders in her phone not as functions but as affirmations. 

Aside from the baffling app correspondences (how is Uber blessed?) people took issue with the level of metaphysical micromanagement she had managed to squeeze into one small home screen. It's bad enough that we're all unhappy and poor because we don't think hard enough, but combining it with our screen addictions goes the extra mile. Put it this way, most Twitter users aren't that grateful for how "connected" they are when they find the next terrible internet thing to get mad at.

girlboss, affirmations, manifestation, manifesting, cringe, phone, apps, folders, twitter
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Meet Peter Kell, self proclaimed "YOLO investor", and the man who purchased a Rare Pepe known as "Homer Pepe" for $39,000 back in 2018. Just recently he sold the Homer Pepe NFT for a whopping $312,000. Know Your Meme sat down with the man and learned the whole story behind his legendary sale.


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'Me After Investing' Memes Boom As Twitter Plays The Stock Market

It seems like everyone and their mom is suddenly interested in the stock market. We're officially on week two of the Reddit/GameStop and AMC stonks saga, and mentions of the movement have only increased in the media. On Twitter, many users have been taking advantage of the ability to buy fractional shares to feel like they're in on the trend. And it turns out investing makes everyone feel a little more rich and a lot more savvy than they actually are. These delusions of grandeur are being documented with "Me After Investing" copypasta memes, which often use images from Wolf of Wall Street to indicate the feeling of being a high powered stock broker. While the memes may seem repetitive in their self-deprecation and tongue-in-cheek nature, we're loving the unity that investing has inspired in the internet. 

Funny Twitter memes, Me after investing, GameStop AMC Dogecoin, lol, stock market, reddit, r/wallstreetbets | melon baby @TaylorGearhart Me after making 5 dollars from investing in amc This is how I win | Nelson @_Baby_Drake_ Me after a long hard day of investing $22.50. .#investor #wallstreet fast food cook
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The internet (and the media in general) is going berserk over retail investors testing the mettle of hedge funds with the help of Reddit. But how did this madness start? Know Your Meme explains exactly how a diverse group of savvy internet users harnessed the power of memes to achieve ultimate gains, starting with GameStop stonks.