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23 Fascinating Facts You Might Not Have Known

Everyday we're bombarded with so much information, our poor brains our bound to get overwhelmed and only process the necessary data, so to speak. It's a shame we can't retain all the interesting stuff we discover throughout our lives, but thanks to the internet and subreddits like r/todayilearned, we can revisit fascinating facts and historical tidbits we might have forgotten—or better yet, learn something new. If you're always the one at the party starting conversations with 'did you know...' then keep scrolling, because we've got a ton of interesting facts for your mind museum. 

today i learned, interesting, interesting facts, trivia, history, reddit, education, knowledge, r/todayilearned, knowledge, true facts, fbi, twilight zone, gaming, politics, nature, science
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Completely True Stories That Sound Made-Up

Some stories that exist out there sound like they're straight out of a movie. They can't possibly be true, right? Not so - writer Aidan Moher tweeted out the other day asking people to share their most unbelievable true stories, and let us just say...the people delivered.

Interesting Twitter thread of stories that sound fake but are actually true | tweet by MorganPielli Replying adribbleofink went Meetup people w/ social anxiety see Black Swan got there realized had no idea who there Meetup. Too shy ask around watched movie alone checked Meetup night turned out everyone else did same thing
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42 Fascinating Pics That Show A Totally Unexpected Side Of History

We love nerding out over history pics and trivia tidbits. If you're also into that kind of thing, then you'll definitely love these photos that show different angles of well-known historical events that you almost certainly haven't seen before.

Go check out Life in Moments on Twitter for more fascinating pics from history!

interesting historical photographs, cool old photos, young Olenna Tyrell, woodstock crowd | attractive woman sitting on the back of a sofa. Diana Rigg aka Olenna Tyrell Game Thrones, 1967. Aerial shot Woodstock 1969.
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Via Cracked
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Movies are really fun as long as you don't stop and smell the civilian casualties or take stock of how many fish Aquaman sends to their deaths or how many people Spider-Man lets get obliterated by a crane or how Ready Player One's Wade Watts is even less cool than we think. "Doctor" Jordan Breeding returns this week to point out all sorts of little depressing details that were snuck into movies that you probably never noticed!

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24 Fascinating Library Secrets Every Librarian Wants You To Know

Libraries are an often-overlooked amenity in society. They provide us with infinite amounts of knowledge right at our fingertips, they can serve as an optimal community meeting spot and many, many other things. This kind librarian took it upon themselves to explain these little-known facts that every librarian wants you to know!

interesting observations and secrets from a librarian | grumpwitch Things have learned about general public whilst working at library: 1 huge number people under 20 can't read face clocks, having grown up with only digital one. 2. Many people don't know spell "library s our email address. This causes problems
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Recently, the meme experts at Know Your Meme sat down with Mike Winkleman AKA "Beeple" to talk about how he got started, the popularity of NFTs, and how he thinks meme owners and creators should sell their work in the future.
 

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FOX's Malcolm In The Middle was popular for many reasons. Frankie Muniz as the hero. Jane Kaczmarek. Bryan Cranston's biggest role leading up Breaking Bad. And of course, the comedy. On the Internet, however, it's the show's opening credits that's had people talking for over 20 years. The collage of footage (set to They Might Be Giants) includes a ski jumper who is on fire - and people have been very serious about discovering its origin. And we're happy to report that YouTuber Kid Leaves Stoops did a thorough investigation and has shared their discoveries with us in this very detailed video.

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Miraculous Times Lucky People Dodged A Bullet

Is one's life just a series of random and chaotic events, or are there underlying patterns that determine the things that happen to us? In the late 1050s, Meteorologist Edward Lorenz was skeptical of linear statistical models of meteorology and pioneered weather and climate predictability through his discovery of deterministic chaos—the theory that though chaotic systems appear to be random, they contain underlying patterns and feedback loops which can be used to explain evidently unpredictable outcomes in weather. And so a small, seemingly inconsequential change to initial conditions can lead to significantly different results. In his 1963 paper entitled Deterministic Nonperiodic Flow, Lorenz claims that "two states differing by imperceptible amounts may eventually evolve into two considerably different states...If, then, there is any error whatever in observing the present state—and in any real system such errors seem inevitable—an acceptable prediction of an instantaneous state in the distant future may well be impossible...In view of the inevitable inaccuracy and incompleteness of weather observations, precise very-long-range forecasting would seem to be nonexistent." Although Lorenz's deterministic chaos theory was focused on connecting cause and effect in weather to the general instability of Earth's atmosphere, the 'butterfly effect' metaphor has been used in different areas, such as quantum mechanics and (oftentimes incorrectly) in fiction. In Ray Bradbury's 1952 short story A Sound of Thunder, where time travel is a mundane reality and wealthy tourists can travel back in time to hunt dinosaurs for sport, one character is warned by his 'Time Safari' guides not to interfere with events from the past more than necessary, since small causes can snowball into catastrophic effects over time. At one point the character accidentally falls in the forest, but doesn't think much of it. When he returns to the present, he notices significant differences in the reality he once knew and eventually discovers a butterfly crushed under his shoe. The death of one butterfly millions of years ago had caused a catastrophic rift in time. Though this is a pretty outrageous interpretation of chaos theory, it's easy to go down a rabbit hole of wondering what other outcomes might have happened if seemingly minuscule changes to our own past life events were possible. In hindsight, it's easy to appreciate those random decisions that help us avoid disaster, but the implication that every decision you make potentially has a life or death outcome can drive anyone crazy.

We've got a bunch of examples of times people 'dodged a bullet' by making small decisions based on a feeling, or sometimes nothing at all. One person recounts the time they randomly decided to cancel a flight, which happened to be Malaysia Airlines flight 370. What at the time seemed like a mundane decision turned out to be a life-saving one. Not all of these anecdotes describe such dire mortal events—most of these stories are about the sort of times when you feel like you initially missed out on something good, but later realize you avoided an incredibly undesirable situation, like a job for a company that eventually goes out of business, or a date who ends up revealing themselves to be a psycho. You gotta wonder—were these people just lucky, or are there underlying patterns at play?

dodged a bullet, reddit, askreddit, reddit thread, lucky, interesting, covid-19, accidents, relationships, butterfly effect, chaos theory, chance
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People Discuss Things That Bring Out The Worst In Others

We've all seen it happen—someone perfectly sweet and lovely turns into an absolute monster when they're suddenly in a situation that brings out the worst in them, like being hangry, or air travel, or being stuck in traffic when they're already late to work. Redditor u/666FuCkThEwOrLd666 prompted r/AskReddit to discuss these common triggers that turn humans into maniacs, and the responses are pretty spot on. 

askreddit, forums, discussion, interesting, opinion, ask reddit, funny comments, social media | r/AskReddit u/666FuCkThEwOrLd666 brings worst out people? | Echo chambers is easy dehumanize people who are different than never spend any time interacting with them.Traditional_Flan_652 Black Friday KingOrion5 Ah yes only day year can see Karen curb stomp kid over PS5
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Via Cracked
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Anyone remember Bat Boy? According to legend, the half-bat, half-boy crawled out of the West Virginia caves sometime in the 1970s, only to be discovered and plastered on the front cover of Weekly World News in 1992. But the adventures of the tabloid legend don't stop there. He became a musical, he bit Santa Claus, and eventually he, uh, maybe mailed anthrax to Cracked.

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Twitter Thread: Chuck E. Cheese Worker Conducts Behavioral Study Using Arcade Games

While Chuck E. Cheese has gotten attention for filing bankruptcy and for their sneaky Pasqually's Pizza debacle, we think this Twitter thread involving the chain is far more interesting. Twitter user @Professor_Palmer took to the social media site to announce that for the past few weeks he's been conducting secret behavioral studies on unsuspecting Chuck E. Cheese game players. The experiments are rather simple, and involve adjusting the use of lights and sound in an attempt to better understand what draws people to - or away from - arcade games. The results? Human beings are really, really, easily manipulated. While this isn't the most shocking insight on our kind, seeing Cary Palmer spell it out in such a fun (and thorough) way has been incredibly informative. And very entertaining. 

Fascinating and informative twitter thread from chuck e. cheese employee who conducted behavioral study using sounds and lights in games to see what people respond to | Professor_Palmer @CaryPalmerr The last few weeks I've begun conducting my own behavioral study in secret. I have been adjusting games at Chuck E Cheese and recording the subconscious response of guest interaction over the week. I've discovered some pretty interesting things. A long thread | This is the game that made me start
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Via FilmIsNow
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It's said that you learn something new every day. Well, today we learned that Nicolas Cage was slated to star in a Tim Burton-helmed Superman film. The movie, titled Superman Lives sounded like the breath of fresh air that the franchise needed. But due to production company drama, the plug was ultimately pulled. These costume tests from 1997, however, give us a taste of the awesomeness that might have been.

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Informative Tumblr Thread Explains The BS Of Women's Clothing Sizes

Practically any woman can relate to this scenario: you're in a clothing store and you find a pair of jeans you like. Only thing is, when you try them on, they're tight in one area and too loose in another. And when you find another size, the same thing happens. What gives? This fascinating Tumblr thread explains why brands intentionally make arbitrary clothing sizes and why celebrities always look like their clothes fit perfectly in every single photo!

Craving more Tumblr content? Check out this thread about the absurdity of learning a language!

Interesting Tumblr thread about clothing sizes and how celebrities get their clothes to fit so well | inkdot This weekend told story which, although kind ashamed admit because holy shit is ever obvious, is kind blowing my mind.
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24 Shower Thoughts For Deep Thinkers

What's a 'shower thought?' It's a fleeting morsel of wisdom that pops into your brain out of nowhere when you're doing something meditative, like showering or trying to fall asleep. Doing an activity that clears the head is kind of like making room for all the delightful randomness your brain is capable of. r/Showerthoughts is one of the best places to consume these clever ideas in bulk, and we've gathered a handful of the sub's latest highlights. Enjoy these thoughts that might cause your brain to do a double take.

shower thoughts, funny comments, deep thoughts, reddit, top comments, interesting, funny | u/AJTangney main reason why music older generations seems better is because garbage is forgotten about | u/mustystache SPOILER Sometimes "Spoiler Alerts" are spoilers.
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Fascinating Tumblr Thread Deals With Common Historical Misconceptions

We've always thought we were pretty knowledgeable where history is concerned. Hell, we could write a book about history memes. We thought we were experts, but now, thanks to one Tumblr thread, we've been properly humbled. This selection of Tumblr posts takes historical notions we took for granted and flips 'em on their head. We're still shook after realizing that Tiffany is a name from the eleventh century. You really do learn something new every day. 

Tumblr posts, history, historical posts, education, funny posts, tumblr | tilthat TIL Tiffany Problem Tiffany is medieval name-short Theophania 12th century. Authors can't use historical or fantasy fiction, however, because name looks too modern. This is an example reality is sometimes too unrealistic. via reddit.com incorrectdiscworldquotes "Authors can't use fantasy fiction, eh see about 35 -Terry Pratchett, probably
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Twitter Thread: A Brief History Of Ancient Roman Fossil Hunting

It's said that you learn something new every day. Sometimes the knowledge one gains can seem pretty mundane. But today, Twitter user @OptimoPrincipi managed to rock our world with an informative thread about ancient Roman paleontology. The short thread is an eye-opener for anyone who thought the science was, well, modern. Turns out that Roman "fossil hunters" were fascinated by the bones of the "monsters" that pre-dated humans, even going as far as to create replicas of the extinct creatures. It's a wonderful look at the inquisitive minds of the past, and a testament to the apparently rich history of archaeological discovery. 

Informative Twitter thread about the history of Ancient roman fossil hunting, archaeology, paleontology, dinosaurs, mammoths, extinct animals | Gareth Harney @OptimoPrincipi 1) An ancient Roman-dinosaur- monster-bones thread! Yes read right did know Romans were keen fossil hunters, fascinated by bones ancient "monsters Augustus liked decorate his holiday-villa "not so much with statues and pictures but with | bones monstrous beasts, famed their antiquity and rarity. He called them bones giants
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