elon musk

Favorite

15 Reasons Bored Elon Musk Is The Hero We Need

Elon Musk has a lot on his plate. You'd think juggling just two plans to colonize Mars and make electric cars are insanely challenging enough to keep any magnate busy for awhile, but not Elon, who now says he wants to take a crack at "merging brains with computers." Well, what if the 45-year-old visionary was a bit more...down-to-earth? Let's take a look at @BoredElonMusk, a parody Twitter account that has been offering solutions to some of the more trivial challenges we face every day since 2013:




list technology elon musk social media - 1932037
View List
  • -
  • Vote
  • -
Favorite

Supervillain Elon Musk Gets Sick of Traffic and Jokes About Boring a Tunnel Under Washington DC and... Oh Wait, He Wasn't Joking

There really is no one like Elon Musk in the world, he truly is a one of a kind human and his dedication to furthering the human race makes him one of the most inspiring eccentrics out there. But can we just talk about the fact that he is one tragic life event away from becoming a James Bond villain, Batman or Iron Man? Like, let's just hope that it's one of the last two. 

Well, now the mad-man has his own boring machine and is making a tunnel under Washington DC all because he 'got sick of traffic' and joked about it two months ago.

Ok. Yeah, this is totally a movie plot. I just hope that he's secretly building a Bat Cave or something and not trying to sink all of Washington DC into the middle of the earth.  

elon musk tesla - 1579269
View List
  • -
  • Vote
  • -
Via: Recode
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Alrighty then Mr. Musk, alrighty then. Here's Musk's argument in full:

"The strongest argument for us being in a simulation probably is the following. Forty years ago we had pong. Like, two rectangles and a dot. That was what games were.

Now, 40 years later, we have photorealistic, 3D simulations with millions of people playing simultaneously, and it's getting better every year. Soon we'll have virtual reality, augmented reality.

If you assume any rate of improvement at all, then the games will become indistinguishable from reality, even if that rate of advancement drops by a thousand from what it is now. Then you just say, okay, let's imagine it's 10,000 years in the future, which is nothing on the evolutionary scale.

So given that we're clearly on a trajectory to have games that are indistinguishable from reality, and those games could be played on any set-top box or on a PC or whatever, and there would probably be billions of such computers or set-top boxes, it would seem to follow that the odds that we're in base reality is one in billions.

Tell me what's wrong with that argument. Is there a flaw in that argument?

There's a one in billions chance we're in base reality. Arguably we should hope that that's true, because if civilization stops advancing, that may be due to some calamitous event that erases civilization. So maybe we should be hopeful this is a simulation, because otherwise we are going to create simulations indistinguishable from reality or civilization ceases to exist. We're unlikely to go into some multimillion-year stasis.

I've never been so sold on what originally seemed an alarmingly outlandish take on, well, life?